Cat Care (Vaccinations)

      Although there is a whole range of illness from which a cat may suffer, some of the more serious infectious cat diseases can be prevented by a programmed of routine vaccinations. Extremely effective vaccines are available to protect against Feline Infectious Enteritis, Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Upper Respiratory Disease (FURD), which is more commonly known as Feline Influenza or ‘Cat Flu’. There is also now a vaccination to prevent chlamidial infection.

 

When to Vaccinate

     Depending on the make of vaccine, injections may be started In the young kitten from eight, ten or twelve weeks , with booster doses being given on veterinary advice. It is common to have adult cats booster at regular intervals, usually annually or once every two years. If you cats is to be boarded or, if a breeding queen, sent away for mating, it is important to have its vaccinations and boosters given in good time. As immunity may not be complete for several days after the injections.

   Cats should have a certificate recording all the details of their vaccinations. If you are not sure when your cats was last immunized, ask your veterinary surgeon to begin a programme of boosters which should be continued throughout the cat’s life.

Major infectious diseases

     Vaccinating your cat will provide it with effective immunization against the following major infectious feline diseases

Feline Infectious Enteritis

     This is a common virus diseases with symptoms of abdominal pain, vomiting and collapse. The cat suffers severe dehydration and, although it is obviously thirsty, it will not be able to drink . Once the disease is contracted, it is difficult to effect a cure and immunization is the only real safeguard. This diseases spreads rapidly among cats, and kittens are especially vulnerable.

Feline Influenza

      An infectious disease common in summertime, ‘cat flu’ is cause by a group of viruses affecting the upper respiratory tract, with symptoms of sneezing, running eyes and nose, and excessive salivation. Prompt veterinary treatment can usually cure Feline Influenza but cats frequently become carriers. That is why vaccination is essential to protect your own and other cats. Vaccination of young cats is especially important.

Feline Leukaemia

     This is now known to be caused by virus (FeLV) which is spread by saliva, urine and faeces. It is not as contagious as other common feline diseases and seems mainly to be spread by close contact over a long period of time. Vaccination of young cats especially important.

     Although there is a whole range of illness from which a cat may suffer, some of the more serious infectious cat diseases can be prevented by a programmed of routine vaccinations. Extremely effective vaccines are available to protect against Feline Infectious Enteritis, Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Upper Respiratory Disease (FURD), which is more commonly known as Feline Influenza or ‘Cat Flu’. There is also now a vaccination to prevent chlamidial infection.

When to Vaccinate

     Depending on the make of vaccine, injections may be started In the young kitten from eight, ten or twelve weeks , with booster doses being given on veterinary advice. It is common to have adult cats booster at regular intervals, usually annually or once every two years. If you cats is to be boarded or, if a breeding queen, sent away for mating, it is important to have its vaccinations and boosters given in good time. As immunity may not be complete for several days after the injections.

      Cats should have a certificate recording all the details of their vaccinations. If you are not sure when your cats was last immunized, ask your veterinary surgeon to begin a programme of boosters which should be continued throughout the cat’s life.

Major infectious diseases

     Vaccinating your cat will provide it with effective immunization against the following major infectious feline diseases

Feline Infectious Enteritis

     This is a common virus diseases with symptoms of abdominal pain, vomiting and collapse. The cat suffers severe dehydration and, although it is obviously thirsty, it will not be able to drink . Once the disease is contracted, it is difficult to effect a cure and immunization is the only real safeguard. This diseases spreads rapidly among cats, and kittens are especially vulnerable.

Feline Influenza

     An infectious disease common in summertime, ‘cat flu’ is cause by a group of viruses affecting the upper respiratory tract, with symptoms of sneezing, running eyes and nose, and excessive salivation. Prompt veterinary treatment can usually cure Feline Influenza but cats frequently become carriers. That is why vaccination is essential to protect your own and other cats. Vaccination of young cats is especially important.

Feline Leukaemia

      This is now known to be caused by virus (FeLV) which is spread by saliva, urine and faeces. It is not as contagious as other common feline diseases and seems mainly to be spread by close contact over a long period of time. Vaccination of young cats especially important.

 

Other infectious diseases

 -There are also some less common but serious infectious diseases for which no vaccine is as yet commercially available.

-Feline Immunodeficiency(FIV) This disease cause an immune suppression which is similar to HIV in humans. It is transmitted by fighting and biting, and entire tom cats are often infected.

 -Feline Infectious Peritonitis(FIP) This inflammation of the peritoneum or lining of the abdomen is caused by a virus. It is a serious condition for which there is at present no cure.

 


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published